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in helping us better understand the link between education and poverty. we all know there is a link between education and poverty, but jonathan, give me the top line of this new book, fire in the ashes, and the 25 years you spent with children and a link to poverty. >> cornell always gets my blood boiling because i agree with him so deeply. i was a young teacher in boston and a white guy living in the black community, and the black ministers did me an honor of letting me stand by his side the first time he came to preach in boston common, and his words changed my life forever. that is when i turned my back on an academic life and decided to teach fourth graders in our poorest neighborhoods. i get so angry on his birthday or on martin luther king day -- i heard politicians who turned their back totally on every single thing he lived and died for, never lifted a finger to bring an end to apartheid in schooling, which is now at a higher rate than it was the year he died, and they say, "i, too, had a dream." you cannot play games with the dreams of our prophets. dr. king did not say he had a dr
that. we need to first get to be fair. if someone's got a dollar and he's educated and he should be in the slot or should be voted for, he should be able to. forget about the billions that people have getting themselves into office. i think it's terrible. host: all right, robert. we're going to leave it there. we're going to take a break from our discussion regarding term limits for elected officials and talk about a decision that was handed down by the federal court of appeals yesterday. to talk to us about that, we're going to bring in josh hicks of the "the washington post," the federal blogger. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. host: the lead in this morning's "the washington post," your paper, says boil boil officials -- says obama officials ruled in power, courts cut power of appointment, judges limit action during senate recesses. the president exceeded his constitutional authority by making appointments when the senate was on a break last year, a federal appeals court ruled friday the court's broad ruling would sharply limited power that pr
's working and what's not. >> we seem to think that education's a thing, like a vaccine that can be designed from afar and simply injected into our children. >> the embattled oakland police department brings on an expensive consultant, but his tough tactics are generating controversy. >> i vote against this contract tonight is not about not being serious about crime. >> apple stock takes a plunge. it's something taking a bite out of innovation at the silicon valley giant. >>> plus. i'm here at the new sfja strzz center in san francisco. we'll go on a behind the scenes tour to find out what makes this place so groundbreaking. coming up. >>> good evening. welcome to "this week in northern california." it's been an eventful week with the governor's address from the state capital, emotions running high in oakland. not to mention a new one of a kind arts institution celebrating a grand opening in san francisco. we have much to get to. let's begin by introducing our panelists. joining me tonight, matthai kuruvila, "san francisco chronicle" reporter. jolie o'dell, of as well as joh
of the schoolkill center and peggy executive director of west harlem environmental education. so nice to have all of you at the table. folks who follow the story know the second part of the story is that the president is deposed by a military coup last year in 2012. the thing i love and hate about that story is yep, that's exactly the problem. we can't make big, sustainable international green policy because we are fighting, literally fighting over islands sinking into the ocean. here, too, we are continuing to fight over all these policy questions and politics questions and missing the big story, the big story that is affecting all of us. is there any way to get us refocused on international inner generational, sustainable and international? >> climate change. we all have skin and neck in it. polls show 49% of americans believe that climate change is occurring and that people have caused it. 24% say it's climate change, but not from people. i'm not sure what science people are waiting for at this point. there's so much more science in and more coming in all the time. none theless, it was great t
to balance california's budget. he also pushed for his priorities including education and regulatory reform. now, john, how would you rate his speech and what left the biggest impressions on you? >> well, you know, rating the speech, a speech from jerry brown is really tough to do because it's unlike any other speech you get from any other governor. how many governors go from the book of genesis to "the little engine that could" in one 25-minute speech? this was a vintage jerry brown speech. i think really what you saw here was a little bit of the governor running a victory lap. proposition 30 passed. temporary taxes passed. the budget looks a lot better. i think this was the governor's chance to pivot, to pivot to talking about what makes california great, how we get them back on track. don't worry, we're getting there. so i took this as a real optimistic speech with a lot of details, a lot of brown history facts. and really a message i think not only to the legislature but to the public of, like, i'm watching it. we're going to be careful, but we're going to move forward. >> and, john, yo
structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it can you imagines what the society could achieve when our women fully participate as equal partners in ev
thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human
, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to cl
heartburn. satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. >>> before brown versus board of education, there was another directive by harry s. truman which banned diskrcrimination o anyone in the military regard l regardless of race, creed or religious beliefs. it with was a historical truth that the u.s. military described as an engine of war by progressives has been a leading institution for fight for racial equality, and because the military leaders carry great weight with many americans, i thought i would remind one american in particular just where the military stands on a decision he will be making very soon. my letter this week is to supreme court chief justice john roberts as he considers a challenge to the affirmative action program at the university of texas. dear chief justice roberts, it is me, e melissa. remember last june you were the deciding vote to uphold the affordable health care act, yeah? well, that was a cool way to ensure the legacy and in truth, it gave me faith that despite your ideologically derived positions and the willingness to overturn established preced
children to read can sometimes be a difficult task but one school developed a fun and education hallway to make reading fun. our education reporter sherrie johnson introduces us to boys, books and basketball. >> look at this shirt. it's a great shirt. >> reporter: it's 8 a.m. at steven forest elementary school in columbia. school doesn't start for another 45 minutes but the library is packed with fourth and fifth grade boils. it's part of the program that's a book club for selected boys who need a boost in reading and confidence. >> the more you a read, the -- you read, the better you can spell. >> reporter: they alternate book club discussions one week and basketball the next book. after the book discussion, it as time to hit the courts. school data shows males are falling behind female students in reading. this program is turning things around. >> it's a gel it make them lifelong leaders, not just this year, but i want them to learn to love reading. as they leave us and go into middle and high school, i want them to continue to pick up books. >> reporter: they help one another and for
on and that is educational. the lathe operator now replaced by a machine . the guy who operates that is a guy with computer knowledge. we are not educating our work force to support the kind of tech lodgical economy that we are going through. >> johnathon a new high in the stock market makes us take our eye off of the ball on unemployment. >> i am glad to see the market up, eric. but president obama's recovery is worst in moderp history . i think wayne's point all of the entitlements that we built up. that intervention prolongs the crisis and worsens the crisis. a lot of the countries that have systemic unemployment. france never had that low since the 1980s. bigger government grows and bigger medockity grows. >> if things are so good out of washington d.c. and hear it out of the obama administration on the recovery. how come 47 million americans are on food stamps and the number that we spend on food stamps tripled under obama's watch? >> look, i agree with you. there is no recovery that we can measure here and you can point to how many people are out of work and lost their homes and on food stamps. we ne
, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agr
and to be part of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from
? >> the evidence is compelling, education, human capital, people can work with information and technology. and many people in american society today, cannot afford by themselves to get that kind of education. you can make resources available to support younger people and families that is good for them, that is good for the economy, and that is good for the tax base. it is going to strengthen the budget. >> in terms of competitiveness worldwide, building a stronger work force, as you mentioned, early childhood education to college education is vital to american competitiveness, suspect it? >> is the number one determining informant. how much do we produce in this economy? number one, looking forward is human capital, that is about education, the ability to innovate and work with the new technologies. >> over the short run, what is the effect of across the board cuts on pell grants on research funding--for medical research and scientific research? >> it is all going to be negative for growth and human capital. it is also going to give you negative impact on the budget. >> while the most immediate con
health care, not talking about education, but you are showing the two guns, because you're trying to solidify to those voters who vote based upon guns, that to me is crazy. and so if you're going to get criticized, you're going to praise guns, you're going to get criticized. so, look, i understand that -- >> but just because someone says that guns are okay does not mean that they are advocating mass shootings like in newtown. >> look -- >> that's aggressive. that's bullying and far worse, some might say. >> last i checked, politics is a rough and tumble business. and i have seen far worse when it comes to commercials. but, again, the point you're making is, when you have a commercial and you want to tout guns on one hand, expect the opposite reaction on the other. >> rohan, i have to say, if that ad is okay, maybe using -- i mean, the other ads that the nra ran that were offensive about the president's children, all these ads seem to be problematic. >> i find that ad really infuriating for this reason. we have some deep, deep problems that drive crime and violence in this society.
, the education department is taking action to make sure disabled school children are not shut out from school sports programs. nbc's chief education correspondent rehema ellis has that story. >> reporter: it was a big week for 13-year-old owen grosser. get in there. >> reporter: sinking not one but two three-pointers the first time he stepped out onto the court this season. owen, an eighth grader, has down syndrome. disabled students like him already have the right to participate in school sports but this week, the department of education released new guidelines on how to incorporate those students onto teams, something some cash-strapped schools have struggled with. >> we have needed more cooperation, more guidelines from the top. and we believe this is going to lead to some standardization and certainly more opportunity for these families and kids. >> reporter: some of the doe's suggestions are simple, a visual cue for hearing-impaired student who wants to run track, the elimination of the two-hand touch rule in swimming so a student with one arm can compete. but the recommendations also st
that americans are too educated to do. >> susie: so what does this mean for your, the group that you represent, there are many small businesses. they hire a lot of less skills immigrants. is this going to help or hurt them. is it going to create more competition for those small businesses? >> no those the employers i represent desperately want a legal way to hire low-skilled workers. they're running restaurants. they're running food processing operations they're running hotels and they face a choice right now. they hire workers and they run them through the system but they're never sure if those cards are accurate or not. whether the system is really accurate. they want ways to hire legal immigrants so that they're not putting their businesses at riskment and ideally this will offer that both by legalizing people already here but also creating a line for workers to come in in the future a pipeline for legal low skilled workers to enter the country. >> how do they feel about this framework, a lot of new rules will come into play here, employee verification papers, things like that. what how doe
sentence. >> that is a concept -- anyway, legislation will be critical. part of our job is to educate congress on what is going on out there. educate the public. we say cyber and everybody's eyes glaze over. i can see it. nonetheless, the call is here. we need to deal with this urgently and imminently because attacks are coming all the time from different sources and take different forms. they are increasing in seriousness and sophistication. >> you mentioned civilian space. there is defense space, the government space than dot com and dot org. that is the civilian space and the overwhelming majority of space. a lot of our temperature is operated by the private sector -- a lot of our infrastructure is operated by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- tha
students and faculty members who want to improve their education or career. >>> it is the defense's turn now in the misconduct trial of the anne arundel county executive john leopold accused of using his detail to make sexual encounters and keep tabs on his political enemies. today the judge dropped one of the five charges against him because the state did not meet its burden of proof. >>> hundreds of thousands of pro life demonstrators packed onto the national mall on d.c., their goal to get the supreme court to overturn the historic decision in honor of what they call abortion's 55 million victims. >> reporter: undaunted by bitterly cold temperatures and of a snow forecast pro life marchers came to washington as they have for four decades determined to instill a culture of life in a nation that they say has seen 55 million abortions since the landmark decision row v wade was handed down. >> can a nation endure that does not respect the sanctity of life? >> reporter: the question is backed by stunning numbers. the pro choice institute finds four in 10 unintended pregnancies in the u.s
defense, national laboratories, pell grants for education, highways, every other thing, the investments that we need to make in research to grow this country, it all gs for medicare, medicare, social security and the debt. every single penny we collect, and that's only 12 years away. now, that's not me talking. that's the congressional budget office saying that. the medicare trustees have told us, the medicare trustees have said that in 12 years, the medicare program won't have enough money to pay its bills. now, whose bills? bills of seniors, bills of tennesseans who have been -- who are some, many are literal counting the days until they are old enough to be eligible for medicare so they can have some way to pay their medical bills. it would be a tragedy if that day arrived and there wasn't enough money to pay the bills, but the medicare trustees who by law are supposed to tell us these things say that day will come in 2024. it's just 12 years, just 12 years away. and that's a day for people already on medicare and people who are going to be on medicare. medicaid, which is a program f
said, i'm going to do it in health care, education and energy. now think about that, health care is one-sixth, and then you control the production and the price and you control everything and he tried to with cap and trade but failed. and education is the future. you control the three elements there and you've goten what lennon would call the commanding heights of a post industrial society. that's what he said he wanted to do. but you don't remember this because unlike me, you have real lives, you don't have to watch everything the man says, i do for my sins and they clearly are many, but he sprinkled that speech and the subsequent speeches until the georgetown speech with a phrase, the new foundation, which was never picked up on and never remembered, but it was in there. in fact, the name of the speech when they give out the printed version of it was called the new foundation. he already saw himself one month into the presidency as a successor to the new deal and the new frontier. he wanted this appalachian, the new foundation, to be what obama is and would be. so it shows you how ide
's program. so whether it's bridging and roads or medical research or education or a number of other things fall under the discretionary category including definite spending. i simply say, we have to come to the realization that unless we can address our mandatory spending, which is running away with the budget and ever shrinking's congress' ability about how we use discretionary spending. unless we can get control of that, everybody is going fall short of what they want. i'm not debating as more money should go to medical research or building infrastructure or whatever. i'm simply saying all is being squeezed and i'm asking you to support your senator or senators or representatives in giving them the backbone and the courage to stand up we have to address this or everybody loses. and i think that is the message of the day. and now we had an election over that issue. we're having a debate in congress every day over that issue. until this point, the president has not indicated post election that he's all that happy about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we can't get there until h
work within our community to educate people about issues of humanitarian aid and world need. and as we raise our community's consciousness, we fund and we raise funds to support relief efforts all around the world. our projects focus on, education, hunger, safe drinking water, and disaster relief, and all kinds of different ways of helping people. we have ongoing projects in cambodia, haiti, and south africa and helping out in areas just as the tsunami in south east asia and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded world and we found that providing a little bi
education is now in the florida constitution. i do believe that in america, particularly, everyone is entitled to a quality education. and most certainly in this country, people should not go to bed hungry. that is just unacceptable. the way that the misery index in this country is one that is way out of the line because of the recent economic situation. i do not think that we as a country even understand how the unemployment has affected so many families, and we have a whole new strata called the new league for, people who were driving forces yesterday and in bread lines today -- who were driving portias -- driving porsches yesterday and in redlines today. we need to make sure americans had the opportunity to have reasonable health care. not excessive. the fact is we've got to make sure that what happened in past -- and we know that. a lot of costs have spiraled out of control. we have to have a baseline. this country has promised that in a sense of being a land of opportunity for all its people. the resources that we have in this country are such that we have to make sure that t
liberal education system as well as a very liberal media in general. my expectation with kids coming out of high school or college this sort of seem to think the government just passed the money and gives it out. if they don't seem to realize until much later in life that they're taking my money and giving it out. so i think it's an educational problem, much deeper than whether a candidate is running in a particular town. thanks for c-span. host: peter, thanks for the call. guest: conservatives have a lot of work to do in the media and in education. the media situation is a lot more balanced than 20 years ago or 30 years ago. a couple of major newspapers and magazines have collapsed. young people can access a ton of points of view and a lot of data and information and that is a healthy thing. people complain about the internet and all of these blogs and what happened to the good old days when you had serious editors manning the phones? i think the current situation is much healthier for a vigorous democracy and there's a lot of good stuff out there. if we have a piece on our website, a w
think that we're more educated on than those, we do know that public pension funds, teachers, all of barack obama's, you know, his starting outfield, they have money in the stock market and this will hurt the stock market. >> i hear you, but, guys, i've got to tell you, a lot of things that rich people have done and agreed to in the last few years that i think hurts them and hurts this country. thanks a lot. see this shrimp, i bet you thought he was a goner. and some lawmakers want to bring back the spending that brought back this critter. attention, all shoppers, your credit card bill is about to get bigger with a new fee kicking in this weekend. and people fee'd up are lashing out. you maniacs, you blew it up! >> charge it up and pay up. starting tomorrow, retailers no longer having to pay the processing fees to credit card companies. part after class action lawsuit rolling. so, who is going to cover the cost? how about you. it could add another 4% to every purchase that you make with plastic. this is a nightmare. >> more than a nightmare. let me tell you people love their cred
population here, they want educated workers to come. but for those who do, it's still back to school. these are spanish engineers with six hours a day of intensive german learning. and it's not just the young. >> you need a lot of time. a lot of effort. and then it's really difficult to learn german. >> difficult even when you can speak some. samuel is an i.t. specialist. he lost his job because of the spanish crisis. now he wakes each day at 4:00 to deliver germany its bread. this isn't the life he imagined. >> after three months if you have to job, you start to run out of money. this is the second step for me. >> there will be many more like him. europe and the unemployment is still rising and the educated jobless will travel wherever they can to build a future. matthew price, "bbc world news," germany. >> 40 years ago today the supreme court reached a landmark decision in the case of row versus wade. it gave women thal constitutional right to abortion but did not achieve consensus. so it's not hard to get an abortion since the court ruling. this report from mississippi. >> anna, h
education. that's my $0.2 more. thank you for joining us. over its record to show. have a great night and will see right back here next week. ♪ says. ♪ lou: good evening, everybody. breaking news at this hour. the associated press reported that one american was the standoff between a terrorist group in this arid desert. at least 20 of the original 132 hostages taken at the bp gas plant still missing. confirming that americans are among the hostages being held refusing to put a number on how many. the leader of the terrorist group signaling that at least two americans are among those hostages, and he is offering to freedom in exchange for the release of the world trade center bomber, the so-called blind sheik. a pakistan scientist jailed for trying to kill american soldiers in afghanistan. the state department flatly denying the request. >> the united states does not negotiate with terrorists said. >> all say it again. the united states does not negotiate with terrorists. >> we do not negotiate with terrorists. we are obviously in consultations. lou: the problem with that statement
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 411 (some duplicates have been removed)